PDA

View Full Version : New 1400 User. Needing some help on Ribs



ahatfield
09-02-2008, 04:34 PM
I have a 1400. I have tried a brisket and some ribs. The brisket I think was my fault and was a little dry (cooked an additional hour) but still good. My ribs were just ok. With opening day of football on Sunday my brother in law wants me to do a couple racks of ribs. I am looking for a really good baby back rib recipe and how you all would cook them where they are gonna fall off the bone!! I have seen either to put a rub on them or baste them over night then put them in the smoker at 200 for 3 hours then pull them and wrap them in foil and put them back in at 175 for a couple of hours. I was not sure what is the best way in the SmokinTex. If you all have any suggestions I would greatly appreciate it!!! My wife also like the ribs to have a little bit of a sweeter rub but I am partial to them all as long as they are moist and fall apart easy.

smokin-tnpete
09-03-2008, 01:56 PM
I have a 1400. I have tried a brisket and some ribs. The brisket I think was my fault and was a little dry (cooked an additional hour) but still good. My ribs were just ok. With opening day of football on Sunday my brother in law wants me to do a couple racks of ribs. I am looking for a really good baby back rib recipe and how you all would cook them where they are gonna fall off the bone!! I have seen either to put a rub on them or baste them over night then put them in the smoker at 200 for 3 hours then pull them and wrap them in foil and put them back in at 175 for a couple of hours. I was not sure what is the best way in the SmokinTex. If you all have any suggestions I would greatly appreciate it!!! My wife also like the ribs to have a little bit of a sweeter rub but I am partial to them all as long as they are moist and fall apart easy.

On Ribs I put his rub on it
http://www.smokintex.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14 and I put the rub on them. I take the skin off the back of them. And I never have any problems with my 1500 drying out meat.
Add some sugar to the above one for a sweater rub. No more than a teaspoon of brown sugar.
I do not use foil with the smokintex. It has always given me a great product and always juicy.
Good luck
Pete

ahatfield
09-03-2008, 03:04 PM
Thanks, how long do you cook them for and at what temp?

smokin-tnpete
09-08-2008, 08:03 PM
Thanks, how long do you cook them for and at what temp?

That depends on what size baby back ribs I can get. If there under 2 lbs. most times 5 hours and there tender juicy and pull back from the ends of the bones about 1/4"/
If there 2 1/2 or better pounds I have had to cook them for 6 hours. It depends on the size of the side of ribs..
I take a long pair of SS tongs and slide them under a side half way. And when I pick them up. If the half sticking off the tongs bends and the meat cracks but does not break. There done for me. After doing them a few times. You will get where you can tell by looking at them and the bend test.
Pete

Franny
09-01-2009, 10:43 AM
Everyone makes taking the skin off the back of the ribs look so easy. I've had a devil of a time and can never get the darn thing off. What's the secret?? Also, do you guys hang your ribs or put them on the racks? I've tried both ways. I don't think I'm cooking them long enough, as they're never the "falling off the bone" that I want. I do use a rub and let them sit in the fridge over night. I'm thinking maybe I should marinate them in some kind of sauce overnight. I'm open for suggestions - can't use sugar though. Thanks

Wheelz
09-02-2009, 10:03 AM
On ribs: Personally, I never put a rub on more that a couple hours prior to smoking. If your rub has a lot of salt in it, doing it the night before could actually begin curing them, resulting in a hammy taste.

One key to doing ribs in the ST is not to open the door too often. On babybacks, absolutely no need to check for doneness prior to the 3.5 hour mark.

I use the toothpick method - if a toothpick can pass thru the thickest part of the meat (between ribs) with little resistance, the ribs are done. Trying to "time ribs" is fruitless. Each rack is a different critter. Don't go by time, rather, develop a test for doneness.

On removing the membrane: You might try a reverse roll. From the small (narrow) end of the ribs, tightly roll the ribs up like a roll of paper towels. This tends to stretch the membrane away from the meat and makes it a bit easier to remove.

I've never used foil on ribs. Mine are great almost every time. Occasionally you do get bad ribs.

Hope this helps a little! :D

Franny
09-02-2009, 11:06 AM
Actually, that helps a bunch. Do you hang your ribs on the hooks or lay them flat in the smoker? I never open the door to check until the time is almost up. Maybe I should check them after 3 hours or so.

Wheelz
09-02-2009, 06:03 PM
I've never hung ribs. Some swear by it, some swear at it.:D I do have a rib-rack from an old Weber, but usually just laying them on the racks works for me.;)

And, BTW, a lot of comp cooks & judges consider "falling off the bone" over done. They are looking for just a little tug - some meat still wanting to hang on. BUT! If you are cooking for the home-folks, whatever floats your boat is fine!.

PuosKcud
09-07-2009, 04:04 PM
... forget the rubs and marinades! :mad:

I have a friend who pays $30/lb for prime steaks and then marinades them for 6 hours; why not just cook SPAM or cardboard?:confused:

I grew up in West Texas (Houston, to y'all) and have been eating, smoking and grillin' "Q" since I wuz 3 or 4 (I'm now 64). :)

I don't know where this sticky sweet sauce and rubs came from, but all of of them KILL the taste of ANY meat! :eek:

At the MOST, I will salt and pepper (fresh ground) both sides of the the meat and toss it on the grill of into my Smokin' Tex Smoker.

THE ONLY SAUCE I USE IS AN OLD TEXAS "MOP". THE MOP IS VINEGAR AND CHILI PEPPER BASED, THIN, NO ONION & NO SUGAR (MAKES THE Q STICKY). I mop the meat every one to two hours. TRY IT SOMETIMES, YOU MIGHT EVEN TASTE THE MEAT!

I USE HICKORY, PECAN, OAK, MESQUITE, CHERRY, GRAPE VINES OR WHATEVER TO GIVE FLAVOR TO THE MEAT; HECK I EVEN TRIED FRESH ROSEMARY ON LAMB ----- MMMMMMM.

I do marinade SOME fish that have a very strong taste if you don't drraw some the fishy taste out of them 9E.G., SALMON -YES -- TROUT - no).

STOP THE RUB AND STICK SWEET BBQ SAUCE REVOLUTION!

Franny
06-19-2010, 07:20 PM
On ribs: Personally, I never put a rub on more that a couple hours prior to smoking. If your rub has a lot of salt in it, doing it the night before could actually begin curing them, resulting in a hammy taste.

One key to doing ribs in the ST is not to open the door too often. On babybacks, absolutely no need to check for doneness prior to the 3.5 hour mark.

I use the toothpick method - if a toothpick can pass thru the thickest part of the meat (between ribs) with little resistance, the ribs are done. Trying to "time ribs" is fruitless. Each rack is a different critter. Don't go by time, rather, develop a test for doneness.

On removing the membrane: You might try a reverse roll. From the small (narrow) end of the ribs, tightly roll the ribs up like a roll of paper towels. This tends to stretch the membrane away from the meat and makes it a bit easier to remove.

I've never used foil on ribs. Mine are great almost every time. Occasionally you do get bad ribs.

Hope this helps a little! :D

Did some baby back ribs this morning. Put a little bit of my rub on right before they went into the smoker. Used 3 little chunks of apple wood and did them for 4 1/1 hours. I still can't get that stupid membrane off and I gave up fooling with it! It really didn't seem to make a difference to me. I realized I wasn't going to have enough for tomorrow and I ran and got 3 more racks. I opened the smoker and took my first batch out, put in the second batch and let 'er rip. I did NOT add more wood. The first ribs were blackened (but tasted great) and the second ribs were absolutely perfect. Both tasted good, but I don't really want blackened ribs. Both had the rub on - second batch maybe a little bit less rub; both were cooked for 4 1/2 hours. Don't know what was different except for the wood chunks. Would that make the difference in the color of the ribs?

Wheelz
06-20-2010, 08:18 AM
The main culprit for blackened ribs is sugar in your rub. Processed (white) sugar burns at a low temp. Try substituting Turbinado or "Sugar in the Raw". Both are less processed and can take a little more heat.

On the membrane issue, it's just a matter of technique & practice. There are a couple of decent youtube videos out there that explain the process.

Also, you might try putting your rub on just a couple of hours before smoking. If you have much salt in your rub, an overnighter can draw out moisture.

Just a few thoughts. ;)

Franny
06-26-2010, 02:12 PM
I don't use sugar in my rubs -I'm diabetic and it doesn't sit well with me. I don't think I kept them in too long because the others were exactly the same length of time. Both batches tasted excellent and were perfectly done - except for the blackness of the first batch.

Wheelz
06-26-2010, 02:27 PM
Two other (or more) issues could be the culprit. First, dirty smoke. Actually, all you want is the nearly clear, blue smoke. Allow you wood to smolder until the white (dirty) smoke disappears then put your ribs in.

Second, paprika will burn similar to sugar.

If all that's disappointing to you is the looks, I sure wouldn't fret it much. Now, if the taste is off, a bit on the bitter side, creosote-ladened smoke may be the issue.

Just a couple more ideas. ;)

Herman
06-27-2010, 01:43 PM
I use the following method on ribs in my 1800
rub 1 part cumen
1 part paprika
1 part black pepper
4 parts sea salt
I apply rub no more than couple hours before cooking
turn cooker wide open which is 250 degrees on the 1800
I use a very small amount of white oak wood because I do not like black ribs

after 3 hours in the smoker I base with a NC vinegar sauce and foil
after 1 hour of cooking foiled I remove from the foil, base again and return to smoker until done-usually around another hour

tender and juicy

Herman