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Bwalk76
06-02-2012, 10:40 PM
Hey everyone, I am smoking a 11 pound brisket tomorrow, I have added rub and have injected as well. My question is what is the temp that I should smoke it at for 10-12 hours? I have read anywhere from 195 to 250, please let me know your thoughts? Thanks everyone

bngood
06-02-2012, 11:04 PM
bwalk hi , i'm no expert but i have smoked a few briskets and i do 225 and you should figure 1.5 to 2 hrs per pound. i've been told that when you inject it could slow down the cook also there is usually a stall where the temp just sits this is where all is breaking down internally. good luck and good smokin.

msnowman
06-05-2012, 12:37 AM
The Temp is really up to you. That range is valid it depends on how long you want it to take. I smoke my briskets at 200 and plan on 1 hour per pound + 2 hours on top of that. I know I found that recommendation here somewhere but don't remember where. Regardless it works well for me. If I was in more of a hurry I would use a higher temperature but I'm a fan of slow and low so that is what I always do. Just plan ahead.

Timdan03
11-03-2012, 10:36 PM
I just got a 1400 smoker a couple weeks ago and tried my first brisket. It's a 5lb brisket that has been in the smoker for 14 hours with the temp set at 215. Currently, at the 14 hour mark, it's only at 170 degrees. What the hell. How do you achieve 1 hour per pound plus 2? What shelf do you place it on? Mine is on the second from the top.

applejack
11-06-2012, 02:53 AM
Hello Timdan03,

I know I am late in responding. First, welcome to the 'family' of SmokinTex users. Have faith - all will get better.

I am curious about your final results. I am also very curious about conditions within your smoker during this cook. Where you placed the brisket in this case should have been the ideal location. I do have a couple of questions as well as a couple of suggestions.

I use a separate Maverick digital thermometer to monitor the ambient temperature of my 1400 while I am cooking anything. It is just a hang up with me but I want to KNOW what is going on temperature wise. I place this thermocouple clipped to the back of the topmost rack so that is always in the same general location. The temperature does swing several degrees when the thermostat cycles the power on and off but that is just the way most ovens actually work and is not a problem. What you are cooking acts like a heat sink and sees the oven temperature as the average of these swings. Do you happen to know what your temperature actually was during this first cook? Was there a drip tray placed on a rack below the brisket? If so, did this drip tray also contain a water?


what I have convinced myself from my own experiences is that when I place a drip pan between the smoke box ( where the heat source is located as well ) and what I am trying to cook is that this shields the item being cooked and dramatically increases the cooking time. What makes this even worse especially when cooking at a somewhat lower temperature is that any water in the drip pan is evaporating and this evaporation WILL also reduce the temperature of the area right over the pan and around what you are cooking. Injecting water reduced liquids into what you are cooking will also increase your cooking time. I am not suggesting that you do not do these things but I am saying these things will affect your cooking times. Just something you will need to take into consideration when planning your cooking schedule.

I also use a dual probe Maverick thermometer that is available from SmokinTex. I would absolutely be lost without this most necessary tool. Last but not least - keep a journal of your cooking experiences and have fun. Almost forgot - I personally like to cook most things at a 225 f average and take a brisket and pork butts to an internal temp of 200 f.

Best Regards,
applejack

Timdan03
11-06-2012, 07:13 PM
Well after 16 hours at 215 the brisket hit 180 degrees so I decided to pull it from the smoker, wrap it in foil and stick it in my oven at 250 for an hour. I then killed the heat and let it sit in the oven for another 30 minutes still wrapped in the foil. After that I pulled it out and snuck a bite, it was 2 am already. It was OMG melt in my mouth tender, however I think I added too much wood chips (two heaping handfuls) and too much salt to the rub. I actually wrapped it back in the foil and stuck it in my oven, turned off now, until 9am. When I woke up I threw it in the fridge and rewarmed it up at 250 degrees for 1.5 hours and it came out very tender in the thick part and a little dry at the thinner tip portion, typical brisket cut. Hope this helps everyone else out with their brisket endevours. This weekend I'm trying a chicken, wish me luck.


Hello Timdan03,

I know I am late in responding. First, welcome to the 'family' of SmokinTex users. Have faith - all will get better.

I am curious about your final results. I am also very curious about conditions within your smoker during this cook. Where you placed the brisket in this case should have been the ideal location. I do have a couple of questions as well as a couple of suggestions.

I use a separate Maverick digital thermometer to monitor the ambient temperature of my 1400 while I am cooking anything. It is just a hang up with me but I want to KNOW what is going on temperature wise. I place this thermocouple clipped to the back of the topmost rack so that is always in the same general location. The temperature does swing several degrees when the thermostat cycles the power on and off but that is just the way most ovens actually work and is not a problem. What you are cooking acts like a heat sink and sees the oven temperature as the average of these swings. Do you happen to know what your temperature actually was during this first cook? Was there a drip tray placed on a rack below the brisket? If so, did this drip tray also contain a water?


what I have convinced myself from my own experiences is that when I place a drip pan between the smoke box ( where the heat source is located as well ) and what I am trying to cook is that this shields the item being cooked and dramatically increases the cooking time. What makes this even worse especially when cooking at a somewhat lower temperature is that any water in the drip pan is evaporating and this evaporation WILL also reduce the temperature of the area right over the pan and around what you are cooking. Injecting water reduced liquids into what you are cooking will also increase your cooking time. I am not suggesting that you do not do these things but I am saying these things will affect your cooking times. Just something you will need to take into consideration when planning your cooking schedule.

I also use a dual probe Maverick thermometer that is available from SmokinTex. I would absolutely be lost without this most necessary tool. Last but not least - keep a journal of your cooking experiences and have fun. Almost forgot - I personally like to cook most things at a 225 f average and take a brisket and pork butts to an internal temp of 200 f.

Best Regards,
applejack

Timdan03
11-06-2012, 07:15 PM
Oh I did not have any drip pans in the smoker, just under it. Also no fancy thermometers just a digital instant read from target and a long analog thermometer which I run through the exhaust hole at the top.


Well after 16 hours at 215 the brisket hit 180 degrees so I decided to pull it from the smoker, wrap it in foil and stick it in my oven at 250 for an hour. I then killed the heat and let it sit in the oven for another 30 minutes still wrapped in the foil. After that I pulled it out and snuck a bite, it was 2 am already. It was OMG melt in my mouth tender, however I think I added too much wood chips (two heaping handfuls) and too much salt to the rub. I actually wrapped it back in the foil and stuck it in my oven, turned off now, until 9am. When I woke up I threw it in the fridge and rewarmed it up at 250 degrees for 1.5 hours and it came out very tender in the thick part and a little dry at the thinner tip portion, typical brisket cut. Hope this helps everyone else out with their brisket endevours. This weekend I'm trying a chicken, wish me luck.

BillyBob
11-07-2012, 10:31 AM
When I do a brisket in the 1400....I cook at 250 and when it is between 165 and 170...I wrap in foil and add some beef broth. When it gets to about 195 I start checking it by sticking it with a probe...the probe should go in and slide out like it is butter....that is when it is done. If it is not that tender....continue to cook until it is that tender......there is no right IT...it is done when it is done. The following is one of the best threads I have ever seen....it is from a fellow bbq breathern:

Follow this thread

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=57882

And you will be happy.

BillyBob