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deeceejazz
11-30-2008, 05:50 PM
I just got my new 1450 smoker and have only done a couple of chickens -- unfortunately, they were hens (all the store had the day after Thanksgiving) and they taste good, but are tough. Using them to add smoke flavor to gumbo, so they should work for that. My question is for advice on smoking a turkey -- should I brine the bird or not before smoking? It usually helps to brine it before baking, but I'm not sure about smoking. Any other advice is appreciated as well. Really looking forward to using this smoker a lot.

dei08dei
12-30-2008, 10:02 PM
I just got my new 1450 smoker and have only done a couple of chickens -- unfortunately, they were hens (all the store had the day after Thanksgiving) and they taste good, but are tough. Using them to add smoke flavor to gumbo, so they should work for that. My question is for advice on smoking a turkey -- should I brine the bird or not before smoking? It usually helps to brine it before baking, but I'm not sure about smoking. Any other advice is appreciated as well. Really looking forward to using this smoker a lot.

I also wondered about brining. I have had my Smoking Tex for over 3 years now. On Jan 2nd I plan on practicing Brining on a small (10 lb) Turkey. This will be my first attempt. My other Turkeys turned out EXCELLENT without brining. Sorry I can't answer your question. I will let you know how it turns out.

Herman
01-01-2009, 01:04 PM
there is not any need to brine turkey in the smokintex-in my restaurant we place the turkey in a basting pan with about inch and half of water then place butter and salt and pepper on the turkey-finished bird will be extremely moist and tender when cooked to internal of 180 degrees in the breast

Herman

dei08dei
01-02-2009, 11:46 AM
there is not any need to brine turkey in the smokintex-in my restaurant we place the turkey in a basting pan with about inch and half of water then place butter and salt and pepper on the turkey-finished bird will be extremely moist and tender when cooked to internal of 180 degrees in the breast

Herman

That sounds like an excellent way to do it. Much easier. I will try that way too. I did give brining a try and this is what I did:

Advanced preparation: 16 hours for brining the turkey
• 1 12 pound turkey
For the brine:
• 1-1/4 cups salt
• 1 quart hot water
• 4 quarts cold water
• 1 cup maple syrup
• 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
• 4 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed with the side of a cleaver
• 10 peppercorns
• 5 bay leaves
• 4 strips lemon zest
• 2 cloves
1. The night before, unwrap the turkey, remove the giblets from the main and front cavity, and wash the bird inside and out.
2. Make the brine. Place the salt and 1 quart hot water in a large deep pot and whisk until salt crystals are dissolved. Whisk in the cold water and maple syrup and add the onion, garlic, peppercorns, bay leaves, lemon zest, and cloves. The mixture should be no warmer than room temperature: if it's hot or warm, let cool. Add the turkey. Place a large zip top bag filled with cold water on top to keep the bird submerged. Place the turkey in the refrigerator and let marinate overnight.
3. Some people rinse the brine off the bird before cooking, some don’t. I was not sure so I did rinse it off. (Remember, I am a rookie at this.). I then cooked the bird for 50 minutes per pound (approximately 8 ½ hours at 225 degrees. It was moist, like NO turkey I have ever had before. My 14 year old daughter who NEVER has seconds had thirds!!! My wife told me she will never cook a turkey again. It is now my job.
Hope this helps. Good luck.

deeceejazz
03-11-2009, 06:05 PM
It's a little farther along in my experience now and I really like the smoker. I have done some chicken breasts and have tried a brisket (good, but a little on the dry side) and a couple of pork loins. I'm working my way up to the turkey. I'm looking forward to trying the pan with water idea (sounds simple to me too), but I'm also going to try the brining approach. Thanks for all the advice.

Herman
03-13-2009, 09:14 AM
deecee

I place briskets in the smokin tex around 9pm at 210 degrees with wood chunk and let it run until around 7am it usually is around 165 degrees at that time
I then completely wrap the briskets in foil and turn temp up to 250 and run until temp is 190-200 and let it rest for about 2 hours and then slice and serve for evening meal on sat at the rant. always tender and moist

btw my rub is real complicated -just salt and black pepper

Herman

ChainSmokr
04-03-2009, 12:48 AM
I have done both brined and unbrined.

The first thing to note is that on most all commercially processed turkeys, it will say "contains up to 15% of a solution". Cryptic enough to be frightening, isn't it? What solution? Well, guess what- it's a brine. Salt water increases the weight too which improves the profit margin.

Your direct store-to-smoker bird WILL come out moist and tender. But, IMHO, doing your own brining makes it much better. Better flavor. Even more tender. And you can add other flavors than just the salt and sugar. I don't think they brine it ENOUGH at the processor.

Brining a turkey is tough though, because it requires SO MUCH liquid volume to soak a whole turkey. You don't get to add ingredients on the basis of meat weight either- rather, it's all about the water volume since the water must achieve a certain salinity to work.

Another note. The brine should not just be "cool" but refrigerated to 40F (overnight) before adding the bird. Even if you mix your brine on the stove and let it cool to 72F, you add the cold poultry and put in the refrigerator, the much of the meat can be in the 60F's range for hours before the fridge cools the whole thing down (officially, over 40F for over two hours is considered hazardous). The meat itself isn't going to cool the brine as much as the brine warms the meat. Sure people have done it, but it's not by any means "safe".