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ksanders
11-20-2012, 07:15 PM
I just saw for the very first time at my local grocery store a fresh whole bone in ham.

These were around 20 lbs and are natural raw ham, with a fat layer around the outside. They look like a pig leg to me.

I've cooked many a large pork shoulder in my smokin tex but never a ham.

My question is how long???

I was guessing at about 215-220 degrees for about an hour a pound or so.

Has anybody tried this???

I'm going to go with a brine solution to inject, something like a water/salt/brown sugar mixture.

On the outside I was going to just use sugar and some salt. I want this sweet, not spicy.

For wood I was thinking about apple but not as much as a pork but, for a little less intense wood flavor.

So, the question is smoking time????

Do I go longer at say 185-200 possibly 24 hours?

Or do I go with my first thought of 225 and an hour per pound?

Or has anybody done this before and have other advice.

admin
11-20-2012, 08:19 PM
ksanders,
Search hams on our forums for more inspiration.
And try this:
http://smokintex.com/forums/showthread.php?461-whole-bone-in-ham&highlight=hams

ksanders
11-20-2012, 08:30 PM
ksanders,
Search hams on our forums for more inspiration.
And try this:
http://smokintex.com/forums/showthread.php?461-whole-bone-in-ham&highlight=hams

Thanks very much The threads are all for pre-cooked or cured hams.

My ham is raw, and I'm pretty excited about it. I also realized it has skin on much of it.

What I'm after is a sweet holiday ham. I'm specifically trying to not cook a southern pulled pork flavor. My family loves my pork shoulder but at thanksgiving we're after something more holidayish.

I injected the ham/leg with a mixture of brown sugar,water and a little salt.

If I don't hear anything to the contrary I'll put the leg in the smoker tomorrow at noonish at 185 with the plan to remove it on Thursday at around noon.

We'll see how it comes out. Being a good planner, the ham is just something to try. The inlaws are making a traditional dinner. We'll try the ham as a reference for future meals.

If anybody has a better idea than 185 degrees for 24 hrs, please let me know. Otherwise I'll post the results good or lessons learned.

BTW I love my smokin tex. I've had it for 2 years and use it every couple of weeks in the summer and once a month or so during our alaskan winter. Last week I cooked a small turkey and it was fantastic! I've eaten at many texas bbq places and my smokin tex cooks just as good or better!

metronome
11-21-2012, 11:19 AM
What internal temp are you aiming for ? Too bad you don't have any sugar maple chunks lying around.
Please post some pics of the finished & delicious product....YUM
I hope to cure and smoke a raw ham in the near future.

ksanders
11-21-2012, 02:34 PM
What internal temp are you aiming for ? Too bad you don't have any sugar maple chunks lying around.
Please post some pics of the finished & delicious product....YUM
I hope to cure and smoke a raw ham in the near future.

I to wish I had some maple, but apple should turn out nice.

I'll be honest, I'm not really shooting for an internal temperature. That might sound flakey, but I'm after the meat being "done" and I'll check it tomorrow when I take it out just to be sure its cooked enough.

I tried using a external meat thermomoter and I found that taking the meat out when it hits the "correct" internal temp results in tough meat. I think it needs to be cooked more.

I've found that for example a 8-10 lb pork shoulder cooks really well at 225 for 10-12 hours depending on the size. Much longer and it dries out, shorter and its tough.

Pork spare ribs are 5-6 hours but I've found cooking just a few ribs does not work as well as cooking a full load of ribs. The more meat, the more moisture.

This hog leg is an experiment. It's in at 185 with a load of apple wood. I'll post how it comes out, and I'll use those results to "tweak" the recipe times etc... for the next time.

mneeley490
11-21-2012, 03:24 PM
ksanders,
If you want ham, you need to cure it for at least two weeks in a wet or dry brine, using cure #1, also known as pink salt or Prague powder. (I'd suggest a wet brine, so you can both soak and inject.) That's what gives it the pink color and "hammy" taste. Otherwise, what you'll end up with is a bone-in pork roast. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

ksanders
11-24-2012, 01:06 PM
The hog leg turned out GREAT!!!

I'm calling it a hog leg because it was just that. It was not a cured ham, and as indicated above it did not have a salty taste.

I was nervous so I turned up the smoker to 200 and about 3 hours into the smoking I poured a half pint of pure organic maple syrup over it.

You could not cut the meat, it just fell apart.

I'm not sure where I'll go with this hog leg idea but it sure was tasty!

Bwalk76
12-01-2012, 10:38 AM
ksanders.... Did you take any pics by chance?