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Thread: My first 1400 arrived today!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Florida Keys
    Posts
    27

    Cool My first 1400 arrived today!

    I opened the box and there was my new shiny 1400. The starter wood is already making it less shiny. I just don't know what to smoke first.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    598

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    Congrats on your new arrival and welcome to the family!!!

    Smoke anything that crosses your path!

    Kidding, of course. Pork shoulder is easy and forgiving, and the leftovers can stretch for days.......

    Enjoy!!!
    Remember: If it weren't for marriage, men would go through life thinking they had no faults at all

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cedar, MN (but still not far enough from the Cities)
    Posts
    732

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    I'm with Darren. A nice pork shoulder is very forgiving, and a nice long first cook. It'll also help with the creosote layer.
    A couple recommendations:
    1. get a good thermometer and use it
    2. get a journal and record your cooks. It becomes your recipe book, and you can identify what you like as well as what you don't. Notes on one page can help you know what to do different next time
    3. chunks are better than chips
    4. Never discount the benefits of a couple charcoal briquettes in the wood box
    5. There is a limit on how much wood. It's better, I THINK to use too little than to use too much and overpower it.
    6. as things sit (think leftovers) the smoke will penetrate more, and the flavors melt together and change and intensify
    7. try different woods to learn what you like, but sweeter/fruit/nut woods on pork and fish, stronger meats need stronger smoke, like hickory, mesquite, even oak on beef. Chicken or fish, maybe alder, maybe apple, maybe nothing if the smoker is well seasoned.
    8. stop back, tell us of your successes and failures. We can help, we can share thoughts, and we can all learn together.
    9. there are no secrets. This isn't tournament bass fishing. The idea is for all of us to help one another get better and enjoy smoked food.

    Finally, welcome to the forum, and, while it's probably for someone like the Admin to say, I'll say it anyway: Welcome to the family!
    I believe in catch and release fishing. I don't want to EAT 'em all, I just want to GREET 'em all!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    140

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwalleye View Post
    I'm with Darren. A nice pork shoulder is very forgiving, and a nice long first cook. It'll also help with the creosote layer.
    A couple recommendations:
    1. get a good thermometer and use it
    2. get a journal and record your cooks. It becomes your recipe book, and you can identify what you like as well as what you don't. Notes on one page can help you know what to do different next time
    3. chunks are better than chips
    4. Never discount the benefits of a couple charcoal briquettes in the wood box
    5. There is a limit on how much wood. It's better, I THINK to use too little than to use too much and overpower it.
    6. as things sit (think leftovers) the smoke will penetrate more, and the flavors melt together and change and intensify
    7. try different woods to learn what you like, but sweeter/fruit/nut woods on pork and fish, stronger meats need stronger smoke, like hickory, mesquite, even oak on beef. Chicken or fish, maybe alder, maybe apple, maybe nothing if the smoker is well seasoned.
    8. stop back, tell us of your successes and failures. We can help, we can share thoughts, and we can all learn together.
    9. there are no secrets. This isn't tournament bass fishing. The idea is for all of us to help one another get better and enjoy smoked food.

    Finally, welcome to the forum, and, while it's probably for someone like the Admin to say, I'll say it anyway: Welcome to the family!
    I'd like to echo the other fellas, and emphasize #9 above. The answers you get from us might not always be identical, but that's because there are several ways to skin cats and people separated by distance and with different levels of previous and current smoker experience come up with different answers to the same questions sometimes. But nobody here will hold out on you if you have questions. The only thing I would say is that you should ask your question a day or two before it's time to deliver, I know I only stop by about once a day or so, and I think the others follow a pattern at least somewhat similar.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Myersville MD
    Posts
    307

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    Congratulations and welcome to the family. Can't wait to hear how your first cook went.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Florida Keys
    Posts
    27

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    Thanks for everyones help. Because time constraints I opted for a whole chicken. I used one of Steven Raichlen's rub recipes (paprika, brown sugar, dried basel and cayenne} after a 6 hour brine. A 5 lb chicken took 3 and a half hours to bring it to 170 degrees@ 220 degree smoker temp. It turn out great, mahogany brown skin and really juicy meat.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    140

    Default

    Success! Glad to hear about your first smoke.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Maryville,Tn Just south of Knoxville
    Posts
    499

    Default

    Congrat's......it get's better each time you use it!

    BillyBob
    "IT'S 5 O'CLOCK SOMEWHERE"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cedar, MN (but still not far enough from the Cities)
    Posts
    732

    Default

    Outstanding!
    I believe in catch and release fishing. I don't want to EAT 'em all, I just want to GREET 'em all!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Congratulations!

    Now the fun begins, cooking for family and friends and watching the smiles on faces!
    Remember: If it weren't for marriage, men would go through life thinking they had no faults at all

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