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Thread: Newbie

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fountain Valley, CA
    Posts
    23

    Default Newbie

    FedEx delivered my 1400 today. This is my very first smoker and looking forward to learning from all of you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cedar, MN (but still not far enough from the Cities)
    Posts
    688

    Default

    Welcome, Nellie!!

    There's lots to learn here, and lots of friendly folks to help. We all want to help you succeed!

    As initial recommendations, I'd offer:

    Get a good dual probe thermometer, with a remote, Like a Maverick brand, or others.
    Keep a log of your successes and failures. Sometimes you land on the answer, but more often it's trial and error. If you know where you've been and you like it, you can repeat it. If you don't like it, you know what you did, so you can not do it again.
    Chunks are better than chips, and start with less wood. Depending on what you're cooking, it's easy to over smoke. 2 oz of wood is a good starting place..
    Start with a smoke that's easy and relatively forgiving, like a pork butt. It's tough to do one wrong, and a successful cook right out of the gate will give you confidence.

    Again, welcome, and let us know how we can help!
    I believe in catch and release fishing. I don't want to EAT 'em all, I just want to GREET 'em all!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    128

    Default

    Welcome aboard, Nellie! You'll be off and running in no time, if I can figure out how to work one of these anybody can. There is a pictures section of the forum you can look at for inspiration/ideas/torturing yourself until you get to try it out.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fountain Valley, CA
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Thank You ia-James. Tomorrow is my trial run day, chicken quarters and two inch strip of pork shoulder. Hopefully both cook at 225 F around 4 hours or less.

    The pork shoulder strip is a Chinese bbq recipe, my friends always made it in the oven but I think this low and slow method is the way to cook due to large amount of honey.

    Good or bad not turning back.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fountain Valley, CA
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Bigwalleye,

    My Maverick dual probe just arrive this afternoon.

    Unfortunately, I just went bought some applewood made by Weber but they are wood chips. Question is do I have to use more of the chips. I have some redoak chunks on hand. We have an apple tree in the backyard I can save some chunks for future use. I surmise, it takes a few months to dry and cure.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cedar, MN (but still not far enough from the Cities)
    Posts
    688

    Default

    Chips will work to start, and I wouldn't use more than a couple ounces. Folks here seem like, and I agree, that chunks provide a longer more consistent smoke than chips, which tend to smoke more, but for a shorter period of time. I have a couple apple trees as well, and i do try to cut them in the spring, and dry the pieces for a couple months. Cutting then to chunks while they're wet will give more surface area, so they'll dry quicker.

    Chips have a place as well. Depending on what you're smoking, things with a short duration. like cold smoking cheese, or shrimp, or steak, I use chips. No point in burning a chunk when you're only giving short bursts of heat and smoke.
    I believe in catch and release fishing. I don't want to EAT 'em all, I just want to GREET 'em all!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fountain Valley, CA
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Bigwalleye,

    Appreciate very much the information you are sharing.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    45

    Default

    The MOST important thing I learned when I joined this group is always cook by the temperature of whatever piece of meat/poultry/fish you’re cooking today. Different pieces of even the same cut and weight can vary in how long it takes to get them to the correct internal temperature for what you desire to do with it (slice, pull, etc.). So find the correct internal temperature you need from posts on this forum and then go by your probe reading......not time. And on big cuts beware of the infamous “stall”. You can find out about it on the forum.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fountain Valley, CA
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ajax View Post
    The MOST important thing I learned when I joined this group is always cook by the temperature of whatever piece of meat/poultry/fish you’re cooking today. Different pieces of even the same cut and weight can vary in how long it takes to get them to the correct internal temperature for what you desire to do with it (slice, pull, etc.). So find the correct internal temperature you need from posts on this forum and then go by your probe reading......not time. And on big cuts beware of the infamous “stall”. You can find out about it on the forum.
    Thanks Ajax, I am definitely watching the internal temperature. My first hour of smoking had just gone by!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fountain Valley, CA
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigwalleye View Post
    Chips will work to start, and I wouldn't use more than a couple ounces. Folks here seem like, and I agree, that chunks provide a longer more consistent smoke than chips, which tend to smoke more, but for a shorter period of time. I have a couple apple trees as well, and i do try to cut them in the spring, and dry the pieces for a couple months. Cutting then to chunks while they're wet will give more surface area, so they'll dry quicker.

    Chips have a place as well. Depending on what you're smoking, things with a short duration. like cold smoking cheese, or shrimp, or steak, I use chips. No point in burning a chunk when you're only giving short bursts of heat and smoke.
    Bigwalleye,

    I did it, turned out good. Chicken was tender and juicy, the pork shoulder strip turned out just right soft not dry even though I had to cook it for 2/12 hours.

    Again, thank you. Next venture is tri tip with Santa Maria seasoning.

    Nellie

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