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Thread: Pork Shoulder Stall?

  1. #1

    Default Pork Shoulder Stall?

    Hey guys,

    I am currently about 13 hours into a 7.5# boneless pork shoulder smoke and was just curious if they stall like briskets do. I woke up this morning and found the shoulder to be at an internal temp of 165, over the next couple hours it climbed to 169 and then dropped back down to 167 where it has stayed for at least a few hours. The smoker is fluctuating what I assume to be normally between about 190 and 260-270 and the thermostat is set to 225. I had this same thing happen with my first brisket and ended up pulling it at 170 since it didn't seem to want to climb above that and our guests had to get home kinda early-ish that evening. I plan on having this pork for dinner in another 3-5 hours but am now questioning if the temp is gonna reach 190 in time. Should I increase temp a bit to try and get it past this stall or what?

    Thanks,

    Max

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    BeachBoy

    I had the same thing happen this past weekend and I let mine go for 36hrs, I was wanting pulled pork. Then yesterday I called SmokinTex and talked to Scott and according to him I would have been fine to have pulled my 7.8# boston butt off after it hit 165 after about 13 hrs. My problem was I had put the drip pan with juice inside between the heat and the food and it became more like a steamer therefore adding many more hours as a reduced heat - I was only able to reach 198 in 34hrs and then it started going down to 194 so off it came - it turned out pretty good and very tender but I wasted a lot of time. I know this is not a real answer but at least you know you are not alone on the time and temp-
    Charlie

  3. #3

    Default

    Charlie, thanks for the reply. I am now at a little over 14 hours into the cook and its still stay steady at 167. I decided to increase the temp a bit to see if that helps. If nothing else, it is a pork shoulder so even if it gets cooked well done on the outside, that only adds to the bark which is a good thing for pulled pork. It is a little frustrating that everyone recommends temps that I cannot seem to achieve to get the amazing tenderness level. I have no doubt that the shoulder is cooked thoroughly at this point but I really want to hit a temp close to 200 for that mythical amazing result lol.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Maryville,Tn Just south of Knoxville
    Posts
    499

    Default

    BeachBoy....bump it up to 250 and check to make sure your probe is in the meat properly. I cook at 235-250 all the time!!!!!

    BillyBob
    "IT'S 5 O'CLOCK SOMEWHERE"

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks for the response BillyBob! I ended up turning the temp up to 250 and after a few more hours, it reached 192 internal temp. It came out with a nice bark, pulled great, and tasted even better. I have been experimenting with woods ever since I got my 1400 and so far hickory is my favorite. This time I used apple and pecan mixed which was not bad but I prefer hickory.

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    Another successful and delicious experiment with my Smokin' Tex!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Maryville,Tn Just south of Knoxville
    Posts
    499

    Default

    Looks good.....hope you didn't waste any of that great looking bark!!!!

    BillyBob
    "IT'S 5 O'CLOCK SOMEWHERE"

  7. #7

    Default

    I salvaged as much as possible, just didnt use areas that were pure fat. But I did tear up and use areas that didn't have any meat but were all bark.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cedar, MN (but still not far enough from the Cities)
    Posts
    732

    Default

    BeachBoy,
    Sounds like you started the night before, but didn't indicate a starting temp. I usually start about 11pm the night before at 180, then first thing (7am) turn it all the way up. Stall typically hits around noon the next day, hangs for 2-3 hours, then she'll start rolling again. Don't be afraid to turn the knob up all the way.
    Cwett,
    I'd suggest eliminating the water pan. I think your times will shorten considerably. Also, be careful your temp probe isn't on or near the bone. Typically results in low readings. (ask me how I know).

    BillyBob is on point re: turning 'er up AND not wasting that bark.
    I believe in catch and release fishing. I don't want to EAT 'em all, I just want to GREET 'em all!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Here is a great article on the science behind a meat stall:

    http://www.amazingribs.com/tips_and_...the_stall.html

    Enjoy!

    Oh, for what it's worth: I've pretty much stopped using foil (the Texas Crutch) - I love the bark more than I wish to speed up the cook, so I simply start sooner
    Last edited by DReeves; 08-20-2013 at 12:09 PM. Reason: Added content!
    Remember: If it weren't for marriage, men would go through life thinking they had no faults at all

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